Electrochemical Energy Articles

  • The Big Deal With FUEL CELLS

    Hydrogen is increasingly seen as a fuel of the future. Globally, more than 65,000 fuel cells, totaling over 300 MW, were shipped worldwide in 2016. Introduction The third industrial revolution, according to American economic and social theorist Jeremy Rifkin, will create a prosperous economy powered by clean energy and the Internet of Things. Hydrogen will be ...


    By GenCell Ltd

  • Porous Titanium in Next-Generation Polymer-Electrolyte-Membrane Fuel Cells

    Porous titanium has found a wide variety of unique and important applications including filtration, separation, catalyst supporting, gas absorbing, gas sparging, current collection, and medical implantation. Manufacture process for porous titanium Raw titanium powder preparation—Cold isostatic pressing or ...


    By Edgetech Industries LLC

  • Ellen Williams: The future of energy innovation

    As director of the U.S. Advanced Research Projects Agency–Energy, Ellen Williams plays a pivotal role in cultivating and guiding energy technology discovery and development in the United States. Ensia recently invited Williams to share her views on what we should watch for in the wide world of energy innovation in the months and years to come. What in your ...


    By Ensia

  • Interview with E. Caglan Kumbur, Ph.D., Asst. Professor, Electrochemical Energy Systems Lab, Department of Mechanical Engineering and Mechanics at Drexel University

    Energy storage technologies have the potential to improve grid efficiency and reliability by optimizing power flows and supporting variable power supplies. However, storage applications are often costly and don’t always produce achievable returns in every grid scenario. Finding a reliable and profitable strategy within electric storage can be a daunting and confusing task, ...


    By Marcus Evans

  • Zinc batteries, back to sources

    The alkaline primary battery is by far the most used electrochemical energy source in the world. But non rechargeable batteries are too expensive for many applications where rechargeable batteries are rather used. First came Ni-Cd batteries, then Ni-MH. These batteries deliver a relatively competitive energy source but they also have some drawbacks. They store at most two times less energy ...

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