Waste-to-Energy Applications in USA

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    Industrial energy and heat recovery solutions

    Rising fuel and electric costs, along with global warming concerns have changed the way industrial facilities view energy consumption. Process equipment and air pollution control systems that were installed several years ago may not reflect the energy conscious designs available today, analyzing these systems to determine energy reduction opportunities can be a very valuable practice. Recovering waste heat is one of the easiest and most utilized means of reducing energy demands at industrial facilities.

    By Anguil Environmental Systems, Inc. based in Milwaukee, WISCONSIN (USA).

  • Air pollution control for the waste gasification industry

    Processes that create a synthetic gas (syn gas) in a gasification process for waste reduction, electricity generation, or steam production (CHP – combined heat and power processes) – commonly benefit from custom heat recovery systems.

    By Catalytic Products International (CPI) based in Lake Zurich, ILLINOIS (USA).

  • Feed-in tariffs while avoiding low price periods

    Biomass energy from gasification, when done responsibly with waste wood or suitable agricultural waste such as nut shells, is often eligible for feed-in tariffs. However, biomass gasification has the advantage of being on-demand, so you can feed renewable energy onto the grid at times when wind and solar are not abundant, enabling you to avoid times when prices are too low due to an excess of wind or solar power being fed to the grid.

    By All Power Labs based in Berkeley, CALIFORNIA (USA).

  • Woody biomass gasification

    Converting wood waste into electricity—lumber mill off-cuts, wood from forestry thinnings (cleared of leaf matter), disposal of wooden pallets and crating (with nails removed). Wood is chipped, dried, and used to produce electricity, reducing electrical costs and paid disposal. Disposal by gasification also has far lower particulate emissions than controlled burns and a lower carbon footprint than decomposition, since methane emissions from anaerobic decomposition are avoided. Decomposing wood reverts all of its...

    By All Power Labs based in Berkeley, CALIFORNIA (USA).

  • Gas Sensing for Gasification

    Syngas (short for synthetic gas) can be burnt and used as a fuel source, the main constituents of syngas are Carbon Monoxide (CO) and Hydrogen (H), which amount for around 85% of Syngas, and it is produced by a process called Gasification. Gasification starts with a base material which can originate from a wide variety of materials for example wood chips and pellets, plastics, municipal solid waste, sewage, waste crops, and fossil fuels such as coal. During Gasification the base material is reacted at high...

    By Edinburgh Sensors Ltd - a division of Edinburgh Instruments Distributor in South San Francisco, CALIFORNIA (USA).

  • Gasification System for Agricultural Waste to Energy, Biochar, and Nutrients

    It’s a global concern. Animal manure, excess fertilizer applied to crops and fields, and soil erosion make agriculture one of the largest sources of nitrogen and phosphorus run-off in the world. Regulations requiring environmentally sound manure disposal inhibit farm growth and industry efficiency and threaten revenue received from sales of manure for fertilizer. Ecoremedy® provides farmers a solution to nitrogen and phosphorous soil loading with a bottom line return.

    By Ecoremedy, LLC based in Mechanicsburg, PENNSYLVANIA (USA).

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