Biomass Thermal Energy Council (BTEC)

The Biomass Thermal Energy Council (BTEC) advances the sustainable use of wood and agricultural biomass for clean, efficient heat and combined heat and power to meet America`s energy needs and strengthen local economies. BTEC is an association of biomass fuel producers, appliance manufacturers and distributors, supply chain companies and non-profit organizations that view biomass thermal energy as a renewable, responsible, clean and energy-efficient pathway to meeting America’s energy needs. BTEC engages in research, education, and public advocacy for the fast growing biomass thermal energy industry.

Company details

1211 Connecticut Ave NW Suite 650 , Washington , DC 20036-2701 USA

Locations Served

Business Type:
Professional association
Industry Type:
Energy - Bioenergy
Market Focus:
Nationally (across the country)
Year Founded:
2009
Employees:
1-10
Turnover:
less than $1,000,000 US

Mission
The Biomass Thermal Energy Council (BTEC) advances the sustainable use of wood and agricultural biomass for clean, efficient heat and combined heat and power to meet America's energy needs and strengthen local economies.

The Biomass Thermal Energy Council (BTEC) is an association of biomass fuel producers, appliance manufacturers and distributors, supply chain companies and non-profit organizations that view biomass thermal energy as a renewable, responsible, clean and energy-efficient pathway to meeting America’s energy needs. BTEC engages in research, education, and public advocacy for the fast growing biomass thermal energy industry.

Vision
By 2025, the use of sustainable wood and agricultural biomass for thermal (heating and cooling) and combined heat and power (CHP) is a mainstream energy choice. Residential, commercial, institutional, and industrial customers choose it as an affordable, clean, efficient, and carbon beneficial alternative to fossil fuels. Distributed energy from biomass thermal/CHP provides reliability and resiliency to America's energy infrastructure, and efficient use of biomass resources. Policies at the local, state, regional, and federal levels support thermal/CHP from biomass equally with respect to other renewable sources of energy. Thermal/CHP from biomass enables sustainable land and resource management, and provides improved soil and forest health, improved water and air quality, and reduced wildfire risks. Thermal/CHP from biomass drives local job growth and economic vitality across America's rural and urban communities.

Advocacy and Government Affairs

BTEC advocates for public policies that recognize the energy savings and efficiencies that can be provided through the use of biomass in direct heat and combined heat and power (CHP) applications. BTEC develops strategic guidance for industry and policy makers that articulates the benefits and promotes the use of biomass thermal energy. A member-led Policy Committee guides the organization’s efforts in this area.

Education and Outreach

BTEC improves awareness and broadens understanding among government and industry leaders, media, the general public, and other stakeholders regarding the benefits of biomass thermal energy and of the technologies that will lead to its wider use.

Research and Analysis

BTEC is engaged in developing peer-reviewed, authoritative research in areas where little is currently available for the biomass thermal industry. These studies will provide the needed data for policymakers, investors, and consumers to make informed decisions related to the use of biomass for thermal energy. A member-led Technical and Regulatory Affairs Committee guides the organization’s efforts in this area.

Renewable Heating, Cooling, and CHP:
The Opportunity of Biomass Thermal Energy

Widespread use of biomass for heating, cooling and combined heat and power (CHP) in the U.S. would reduce greenhouse gas emissions, decrease our dependence on foreign fossil fuels, and create jobs in rural communities hardest hit by the recession. And yet, despite these benefits, biomass thermal energy has been largely overlooked in the discussion on how to address America’s energy challenges. 

Thermal energy represents roughly one-third of total U.S. energy consumption. It is used daily by homes, businesses and industrial facilities across the country, most frequently for space heating, water heating or industrial processes. Biomass can be an efficient source of renewable energy for all of these heating and cooling needs.

Highly Efficient, Yet Largely Forgotten in Public Policy

Energy efficiency measures the ratio of useful output compared to fuel input, acting like an energy return on investment.  Modern and commercially viable biomass heating, cooling, and cogeneration technologies can reach efficiency levels of up to 80-90%. Biomass thermal technologies can generate more usable energy per unit of fuel than better known—and better funded—renewable biomass pathways: